Site Selection: The Questions Continue

In a recent blog on destination selection, I covered tips on what to look for in air and ground transportation and local activities were covered. In the April 30 webinar (scroll down to "On Demand" webinars and the one titled "Site Selection Best Practices"), destination and site safety and security (including destination infrastructure issues), labor conditions, sustainability (of people and the environment), CSR – corporate social responsibility, and accessibility for people with disabilities were discussed with tips about what to do when a group is seeking destinations and sites. (You can listen to the webinar at any time and send questions to me here as comments at the end of the blog.)  

There are so many more considerations when selecting a site – some dependent on a group’s demographics, objectives, and program, and others more generic – that we want to present more to include in your RFP, your questions, and if possible, to see when you conduct a site inspection.

Guest Room Types and Locations

One of my favorite industry expressions: rooms described as having a “partial ocean view”! I’ve always thought those were the ones that, if one’s head and part of her or his body were stuck out a window turned to the side, you might see a bit of water! Knowing what you may be buying and what your meeting participants will receive is critical to the happiness of their stay and the success of the meeting even if participants are only in their rooms to sleep. Ask:

  • How many floors are in the hotel and on each floor, how many rooms? How many rooms have one bed and what type and how many have two beds and what type are those? Does the hotel own roll-away beds or cots (which) and how many for use for additional people per room? Asking the maximum number of people allowed per room is critical especially if your participants bring family members or if there is greater triple or quadruple occupancy.
  • Many hotels in the United States are non-smoking; don’t assume all are. Find out if there are any rooms in which smoking tobacco is allowed and how many there are, their location, and the ventilation system between floors if smoking is allowed. Ask for a full description of ADA-qualified rooms – if they have roll-in showers, different configurations for HVAC controls and controls to operate window treatments; if all ADA rooms are equipped with Deaf Kits or if those are separate, and how many ADA rooms have connectors.
  • Speaking of connecting rooms, it’s nice for those who want to be next to their children or a relative or friend. These are not so nice, because of lack of sound-proofing, for other guests. Find out how many connecting rooms exist and how informed the front desk is about room types to advise people when they check in.
  • That last bit of advice is also about distance from elevators. Some people want to be far away; others (like me) want to be closer for easy access. Distance, I’ve found is subjective! Ensure the front desk has maps and can show guests exactly where their rooms are and know if the room is a connector.
  • People with allergies want to be in rooms that are designated hypo-allergenic. That usually means there are no feather products and no scented amenities and the HVAC vents are cleaned more often than others, tho' cleaning of vents is critical to everyone's health. Determine how many are in the hotel or what can they do to make a room friendly for those with allergies and how much time it takes.

 Guest Room Amenities  

Travelers take it for granted that guest rooms will have a flat screen TV, a “comfortable” (based on someone’s taste) bed, bathroom amenities of shampoo, soap and perhaps other items. Don’t assume it! Ask about those items and others:

  • Is there an in-room safe in each room? Is there a charge to use it and what is that charge? If there is a mini-bar and how is it operated? Is there a restocking charge if anything is used? If so, what is that charge and is there a service charge and tax applied to the cost of the item and restocking? Ask if the mini-bar refrigerator is a real refrigerator or a cooler: those who want to store their own food and/or medicine will need to know. And if refrigerators don’t come with the room, ask how many the hotel has and what the charge is to use them. (If you know many in your group need refrigerators ask how many the hotel can rent and if there is both a charge-back to the guest or group and a mark-up on that charge and the amounts.
  • We all want free Wi-Fi and as much as we want that, we want a good desk, with outlets above the floor and plenty of them. My favorite “amenity” are the bedside lamps with outlets in them – great at night for all kinds of devices – especially with my “outlet adder”.We also want an adjustable good desk chair. Many "lifestyle hotels" have cool and funky chairs at the desk or no desk at all. Consider your audience when looking at the business needs in a room.
  • Are there landline phones on the desk, bedside, and in the bathroom? Many hotels are eliminating one or more of those which can be inconvenient if one’s mobile device doesn’t work in the room or additional help is needed. Not everyone gives out their mobile number and in an emergency the hotel (and meeting planner) may need a method of reaching a guest. Ask too about the voice messaging system and if it’s accessible outside one’s guest room.
  • There are many people who do not travel with all the electronics that some of us expect they do. Ask about radios with or without a port for an MP3 player. Are there other electronics in the room for entertainment and/or business use? If a coffee maker is in the room, ask if coffee (tea? other beverage?) and condiments are complimentary, or if is there is a charge on the first use or on subsequent uses, and a restocking fee. If there are fees, what are those fees? Then there’s the ironing board and iron. Even we short people may have long clothing and some ironing boards are mini ones. Nothing more frustrating to learn that until after one is attempting to iron.

Guest Room Safety

There are some obvious areas that most planners consider when looking at guest room safety. Those include: internal or external (outside) access to guest rooms; location of exits, fire extinguishers, emergency exits. Many hotels have eliminated house phones in hallways or only have them near the elevators. Find out. If an emergency occurs near a guest’s room and one’s mobile device is not in hand, lack of house phones could add to the emergency.

Other areas to include in your questions:

  • Smoke and CO2 detectors in all guest rooms; in hallways                         
  • Audible or visual smoke detectors in ADA rooms; Deaf Kits for other rooms with those included                          
  • Sprinklers in all guest rooms; in hallways.                                   
  • Fire extinguishers in hallways; how often tested
  • Automatic fire doors
  • Auto link to fire station
  • Auto recall elevators
  • Ventilated stairwells; stairwells with emergency lights
  • Visible emergency information in all guest rooms
  • Safety chain or bar on door and doors with viewports (“peep holes”)                            
  • Deadbolts on all guest room doors
  • Restricted access to guest floors            
  • Secondary locks on guest room glass doors
  • Room balconies or patios accessible by adjoining rooms/patios/balconies (if applicable)
  • What are the SOPs for power outages? What is the power back up? How many generators are on property and what do they power?
  • If a guest has an emergency, should they call “911” or other local emergency number or the hotel front desk or help line? Is the front desk always staffed to answer the phone? How many rings does it take at noon? 6 pm? Midnight? 3 to 7 a.m.?

And our favorite: bedbugs. How are guest rooms checked and protected? How often? What does the property do to ensure elimination of bedbugs?

The items in this blog, the previous blog and the webinar are a fraction of what I include in the RFPs and the questions I ask when helping clients select meeting destinations and sites. It pays to be this thorough. If you were buying an electronic device, you’d want to know more than what’s on the outside, right? It’s even more important to have a complete picture and details of what you are ‘buying’ for a meeting.

Next time I’ll delve into on-property amenities and services. Those continue to change rapidly.

Posted by Joan L. Eisenstodt

Follow Joan on Twitter: @joaneisenstodt

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