Is Alcohol Needed at Meetings & Events?

Is Alcohol Needed at Meetings & Events?

The stories from Russia about the lives lost to alcohol poisoning (from both vodka and less traditional "beverages") are devastating but no more so than this article about the how heavy drinking for women has been "normalized" or even romanticized.

I’ve written before about this topic and will continue to talk and write about it because it is a health and a safety issue—for those who consume alcohol, those who are in their paths when they drive and all those who surround them.

It’s an issue of host responsibility and liability when one has a holiday* (office, friends and/or family) party or a meeting or event or invites others to events as suppliers in our industry do. It astounds me that we still consider an event not "festive" enough if alcohol is not served. Given the make up of our industry (believed to be mainly women) you’d think we’d be more careful about wanting to not poison people. 

I drink now and then. In my immediate family, alcohol just wasn't consumed so I never developed a "taste" for it and I'm fortunate to not be an alcoholic, active or in recovery, as so many friends and colleagues are. I've always said I'm not "anti" alcohol consumption but after reading the above noted story about women and consumption, I may change my mind.

These guides from MADD and FindLaw cover dram shop laws; another from the Global Gaming Business Magazine provides more information. It’s always best to talk with your organization’s or client’s attorney and those involved in risk management to learn more about you and your organization's responsibilities for alcohol service.

Laws vary by country. If you’re conducting a meeting or business outside the United States, learn more about customs and laws to ensure safety and protection and appropriate behavior.

Whether it’s New Year’s Eve or an industry event, a family gathering or a meeting you’ve planned, plan responsibly for alcohol consumption and consider if you really need it at all.

*If you’re already looking ahead to next "holiday season," please try to be inclusive of all: not everyone is permitted to attend parties; not everyone celebrates the same winter holidays; and if you’re decorating in red and green, considered traditional Christmas colors [Hanukkah’s are silver or white and blue; Kwanzaa's are red, black and green], call it a “Christmas party” since the decor won’t fool anyone!

I wish a safe and healthy new year to each of you. Watch for the Jan. 6 Friday With Joan newsletter for hopes and predictions from me and others in our industry.

And as always, the views expressed here are my own and may not be those of the owner and publisher of this blog.

Posted by Joan L. Eisenstodt

Follow Joan on Twitter: @joaneisenstodt

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