32 Questions About the Industry

There are so many things about which I wonder—and guess you might too—regarding our profession, industry, hotels, air travel and service. Ending the year and starting a new one with questions will stimulate our brains and perhaps give us new information in the answers some may have. If you have an answer to any of these questions, please share in the comments!

Hotels and Decor:

  1. Why do hotels do cute flowers folds with facial tissues? Who uses the tissues that are in the folds? If they are all thrown away, isn’t this an anti-green practice?
  2. If the table/desk is right under the flat immovable TV screen, does anyone watch?
  3. What decorator thought this giant clock on a wall of a hotel room was a good idea? (Right ... I thought the same…).

Hotels and Service:

  1. What will it take for CSMs (or Event Service Professionals as they are now known) to a) be given recognition? b) receive better compensation for rebookings since we know it’s their service that brings us back and not the sales?
  2. In what ways can planners encourage the hotels with which they work to have the Event Service Professionals join ESPA? Would you negotiate it into contracts?
  3. When and why did hotels start outsourcing bell service, security and housekeeping? Does it matter to you?  
  4. Housekeepers work very hard especially with the better (heavier) mattresses. Why are they not compensated well for this hard work? Would you do this job for less than $20/hour? Until what age? And why don’t guests say anything pleasant to housekeepers they see in the hotel hallways? (Do you?).
  5. What percentage of guests do you think tip housekeepers? Does this surprise you? Do you encourage meeting participants to tip? (Also see story in the question No. 9 below about what guests tip … at a luxury hotel). What do you tip?
  6. Do you think this hotel—touting their service—compensates its service workers better than others? 

Hotels and Amenities:

  1. Why are bathroom products highly scented? Why not unscented ones that anyone, especially those with chemical sensitivities or allergies, can use? Why is there a “war” on bathroom products? 
  2. About that non-dairy liquid “creamer” for the in-room coffee, what is it really?
  3. First it was in-room irons and ironing boards which were, if you’re new to the industry, not a standard in hotel rooms. Then "amazing" mattresses. Then flat-screen TVs. Then cooler tech. What's the next cool thing that will be useful for all? Is it no tables or desks in rooms?
  4. And as a colleague asked, where will one eat? On the bed? And if on the bed, who will change the sheets and covers when something is spilled?
  5. What’s the one amenity (rechargeable flashlights? Clorox or other wipes for the remote and hairdryer?) you still want in a hotel room?

The Meeting Profession:

  1. Who started the rumor—and when—that this (planning) was a glamorous profession?
  2. If this is glamour, how does it compare to other professions that are also considered glamorous?
  3. Andrew Young said, at an MPI meeting many years ago, there had to be a planner for the Last Supper! Who were the innkeepers and planners then and what did they do? How have the professions of innkeeper (hotelier) and planner evolved other than use of technology?
  4. What keeps us doing this year after year? At what age do you think a meeting planner/professional should retire?
  5. What do you prefer to be called: meeting planner? meeting professional? supplaner (with thanks to Charles Chan Massey)? Other?

Meeting Logistics:

  1. Why have the inventors of "air walls" not been held criminally accountable?
  2. Do any hotel bars have lower areas to accommodate people using mobility devices? Where are these places?
  3. In what year do you think hotels will begin to set rooms to maximize education and learning and interaction versus basing space allowance on numbers?
  4. How many planners, in addition to me, have gifted “Seating Matters” to hotels, conference centres and convention centres to ensure learning and interaction matters? (Disclaimer: I wrote the foreword for the book and was not compensated nor am I compensated for recommending it or its sales).

Travel:

  1. When you think of early days ('50s) of commercial air travel, what do you think most people remember? (Me? Dressing up. Walking out on the tarmac to board the plane).
  2. What’s the liability for airports that serve alcohol unmonitored and flight attendants who serve liberally, especially in First Class, when a passenger misbehaves on a flight or harms her/himself after deplaning?
  3. When did the custom (law?) for traffic to stop for funeral processions end and why? 
  4. We tip "redcaps" who take us to trains and tip service personnel on trains. Why don’t we tip flight attendants?
  5. And did you know that flight attendants are paid hourly and that layovers are not paid time? (Thanks to my friend flight attendant, Tim, for sharing all about this).

Sharing Economy:

  1. Would you share a hotel room with a stranger?
  2. How can meetings capitalize on the sharing economy other than reusing flowers from another meeting? Or piggy-backing on a tradeshow for carpet use? Could two or more groups work with hotels and do (continuous) breaks like conference centres
  3. Will your group(s) book more rooms with Airbnb than hotels?
  4. How are corporate and association policies changing to accommodate use of sharing economy services?

After going through the Chief Question Officer training, my SOP became even more about questions than answers. If you have more questions—or answers and resources—to share, drop them into the comments and refer to the question number to make it easier for others to follow.

Watch for "Friday With Joan" on Friday, Jan. 8, 2016, along with a link to the Meetings Today #Meetings2016 trends survey results. And in case you missed it, here's a full recap of the 2016 Meetings Trends Twitter Chat, which I moderated for Meetings Today.

Here’s to a healthy, safe new year of learning and supporting each other in the profession we’ve chosen or that chose us.

As with all of my blogs and commentary on this site, these views are my own and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Meetings Today and its parent company/publisher. Want to comment to me only or ask me to post a comment anonymously for you? Send me an email.

Posted by Joan L. Eisenstodt

Follow Joan on Twitter: @joaneisenstodt

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