Sarah and Courtney answers additional questions from the 01.23.19 #MeetingsToo: How to Prevent & Manage Sexual Harassment at Events webinar.

1. Is there a template for the checklist to use at events and if so where can we find it?

We provided a base to get you started on the process of building a strategy around sexual harassment prevention measures internally and externally to your members, employees, and/or event attendees. Outside of the checklist we provided in this email, we work one-on-one with organizations and their Human Resource departments to establish language for a code of conduct, a mission statement and piece together a communication plan to share with employees and members of your organization. We also help train teams to ensure they understand how to properly handle any claims that may arise from members or event attendees. Should you have any questions or want to learn more about our services, please contact us at info@sarahandcourtney.com.

2. Is it legal to give out attendee participation listings? If so, what happens when you get a call that a perpetrator of another attendee will be in attendance?

Due to privacy concerns and new laws that have taken effect like General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), we don’t recommend making attendee participation lists public. However, should an attendee catch wind that a perpetrator of will be in attendance, you should be able to comfortably explain your action plan should the perpetrator act inappropriately at your event. This will give the concerned attendee more confidence in knowing that your organization is not only aware of past behavior, but ready to take timely, efficient and legal action should there be an issue onsite.

3. One of the biggest challenges our organization is having is finding a good solution for legal counsel. Fees associated with following through on claims are very high. Any advice on the best way to execute the code of conduct process while managing a modest budget?

An alternative to legal counsel could be understanding what other organizations have done successfully. One way of conducting quick research is by posing this same question in an online industry association forum like MPI, PCMA, ASAE, etc. Should there be a positive response from organizations within the forum that have gone through the legal process, reach out to inquire on some of the language you can use in your own code of conduct. Though this may be a good starting point, we do recommend soliciting a lawyer’s services to review the code of conduct that your team has crafted. Additionally, we work with organizations to help craft an effective contingency plan that equips your team with knowledge of preventative measures to efficiently handle any claims made onsite at your event.

4. Is there a group or organization you would recommend to serve as a third party on investigating claims that are put forward? Attorney fees add up quickly and we want to ensure we budget enough money for potential claims and follow through accordingly.

NAVEX Global’s EthicsPoint system, a third party reporting tool that association Meeting Professionals International leverages, captures and investigates ethics & compliance reports from across your organization in a centralized database. The service collects issues through hotline services, web intake forms, face-to-face conversations and concerns raised through questionnaires. Considering using a tool like the EthicsPoint system is a good place to start, but ensuring your organization understands the platform’s limitations (i.e: communicating directly with the individual who filed the report) is just as, if not more important.r a lower-than-rack-rate [depending on the timing of the inspection and the occupancy] for the site visit and attempt to negotiate that if you book that hotel within a certain period of time (also negotiable) that amount will be deducted from your master bill.

 

Click here to watch "#MeetingsToo: How to Prevent & Manage Sexual Harassment at Events" on demand!